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Black Entertainment, Money, Style and Beauty Blogs - Black Voices

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    From BlackVoiceNews.com:

    As if black parents didn't have enough to worry about, a new study finds that in some areas, black children are consuming more media than any other racial group.


    A new study compiled by Northwestern University was released June 8, focused on children who consume several types of media. Researchers say the study, titled "Children, Media and Race: Media Use Among White, Black, Hispanic and Asian American Children," is the first national study focused specifically on media consumption by race and ethnicity.

    The findings show Black and Hispanic youth consume more than three hours of television daily. Whites and Asians consumed more than two hours. Technologies such as DVDs, TiVo, and mobile and online viewing increased television consumption to 5 hours and 54 minutes for black children, 5 hours and 21 minutes for Hispanics, 4 hours and 41 minutes for Asians, and 3 hours and 36 minutes for whites.

    Read more here.

     

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    From AOL Latino:

    Authorities have revealed that black residents in a Southern California city were under years of attack by a Latino gang who conspired to terrorize them through racial intimidation, threats and violence - all to display loyalty to the Mexican Mafia prison gang.

    The attempt by Varrio Azusa 13 gang to drive out black residents Azusa, which is near Los Angeles and has a population of about 45,000 residents, was unveiled yesterday in a federal racketeering indictment unsealed on Tuesday.

    More than 50 people were charged as authorities made early morning raids. Federal prosecutors said the gang, which has about 400 members or associates, engaged in a host of crimes ranging from drug trafficking to hate crimes that have hobbled city.

    "We hope that this federal case will signal the end of this racist behavior and will help vindicate all of the victims who have suffered over the years," U.S. Attorney André Birotte Jr. said.

    Read more here.

     

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  • 06/09/11--04:57: Sugar Hill Gang
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    Sugar Hill Gang


    In a perfect world, the Sugar Hill Gang would be unquestionably praised for their contribution to hip-hop. Their 1979 hit, 'Rapper's Delight,' was the genre's first pop crossover smash. Although that song still packs dance floors thirty years later, the New York trio's success will be forever shrouded in controversy.
    According to hip-hop lore, the group started off as a novelty act. Sugar Hill Records honcho Sylvia Robinson, a former R&B singer, realized that recording rap music could be lucrative so she looked to create a group for the burgeoning label.

    After hearing some DJs rapping over records at a party, Robinson tasked her son Joey to find emcees that she could record. Joey tapped his friend Henry Jackson, who was a bouncer and part-time hip-hop manager at the time. Since Jackson was not exactly adept at rhyming, legend has it that he asked Grandmaster Caz (short for Casanova) of the Cold Crush Brothers to borrow some rhymes from his rap notebook with the promise that once Jackson (who went by the name Big Bank Hank) got signed, then he'd look out for Caz and Cold Crush.

    But in perhaps the first major example of a shady hip-hop deal, that didn't happen. Jackson linked with Master Gee (Guy O'Brien) and Wonder Mike (Mike Wright) to form Sugar Hill Gang and record 'Rapper's Delight,' which went on to sell 2 million copies and solidify hip-hop as viable recorded music, not just limited to live DJ gigs and park jams.

    The evidence of Jackson's plagiary is so blatant. He even spells Caz's name at one point: "I'm the C-A-S-A-N-O-V-A..." The record, which is built on the groove of Chic's 'Good Times,' represents a tipping point when commerce made its first real mark on the art form.

    In his retrospective of the seminal label, 'A Complete Introduction of Sugar Hill Records,' one-time in-house drummer Keith LeBlanc told the 'Village Voice' that among the rap community at the time, the trio wasn't accepted as real rappers but instead three dudes who just "got lucky."

    "For Big Bank Hank, they definitely had to write raps for him. I know the Furious Five helped him write at times, and [fellow Sugar Hill Gang member] Wonder Mike would help him. Sometimes Sylvia Robinson would even help write lyrics for them. It was a joke in the company -- they'd make jokes in the studio under their breath. It was also kinda a joke that it was really hard to make them sound funky. Compared to the Furious Five, Spoonie Gee or Kool Moe Dee, it was night and day. To be honest with you, the only one in the Sugar Hill Gang to me that was creative was Wonder Mike. He wrote all his own stuff and was a funny guy. He could have been a comedian. He used to do this routine where he'd do an imitation of a black weather man, like how a black rapper would do the weather, cause in those days there weren't any black people on TV."

    Though the Sugar Hill Gang released a couple other moderate hits - '8th Wonder' and 'Apache' - the trio never eclipsed the success of 'Rapper's Delight.'

    These days, the trio still packs in crowds at nostalgia rap tour dates around the globe.

    Influenced...DJ Jazzy Jeff & the Fresh Prince, MC Hammer, Soulja Boy





    'Rapper's Delight'

     

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    Michelle Obama

    From The Huffington Post:

    LOS ANGELES -- Michelle Obama is going to be on one of Nickelodeon's most popular shows.

    The first lady is set to appear on an upcoming episode of the comedy "iCarly" to promote Joining Forces, an initiative aimed at increasing awareness and support for military families, network president Cyma Zarghami said Wednesday.


    The show's main character, Carly Shay (Miranda Cosgrove), is the daughter of a colonel serving overseas in the military. When Carly's two best friends break some rules to set up a web chat so Carly can speak to her dad on his birthday, "the first lady discovers it and comes to have a chat with them in the most positive way possible," Zarghami said.

    Show creator and executive producer Dan Schneider wrote the episode just for Obama and her Joining Forces initiative.

    "When she approached us, after he was done jumping for joy, Dan sat down and came up with a very, very clever idea," Zarghami said.

    The network president said she wasn't concerned that featuring the first lady and promoting the Joining Forces program would make a political statement for the show or Nickelodeon.

    Read more here.

     

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    From CascadePatch:

    Southwest Atlanta residents can look forward to receiving fresh fruits and vegetables from local farmers, courtesy of the Fulton County Cooperative Fresh Mobile Farmers' Market.
    The Fulton County Cooperative is part of the University of Georgia's Cooperative Extension, founded in 1914 to share research-based agricultural education and improve quality of life for Georgia citizens. The Mobile Farmers' Market is one of the cooperative's programs aimed at addressing health disparities in "food desert" communities - those with very few or no stores that sell fresh produce.

    According to a PolicyLink study cited recently by the Fulton County Cooperative, "millions of Americans in low-income communities and communities of color walk out their front doors and see nothing but fast food and convenience stores selling high-fat, high-sugar processed foods," the consumption of which, no doubt, contributes to obesity and onset of chronic illnesses.

    The mobile unit made its initial run Wednesday with stops along Ralph David Abernathy Boulevard and Donald Lee Hollowell Parkway.

    Read more here.

     

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    Lupe Fiasco

    From The Huffington Post:

    A few weeks ago, the political right criticized President Barack Obama for having Common, a Chicago-native rapper, to the White House for a poetry reading.


    Now, the situation's turned on its head, as a Chicago rapper is attacking the President for being too far right in his foreign policy.

    In an interview on "What's Trending," a CBS News video segment, Lupe Fiasco -- a rapper known for his socially conscious and politically charged lyrics -- had some harsh words for the president.

    "In my fight against terrorism, to me, the biggest terrorist is Obama, and the United States of America," Lupe told host Shira Lazar.

    Read more here.


     

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    selita ebanks

    A few years R&B singer Cassie started the half shaved head trend. It looks like model Selita Ebanks might start a jump off trend with this half black, half blonde do. At the Samsung Hope For Children Gala she turned heads with her bold cropped look.



    Closeup

    selita ebanks


    Full Length
    Selita Ebanks

     

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    From CBS News:

    Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain told Hotsheet Wednesday that racist accusations about the movement are "ridiculous."


    "I have been speaking to Tea Parties, Americans for Prosperity, since 2009, before it was cool," Cain said, before pointing to victories in recent straw polls. "...If the Tea Party organization is racist, why does the black guy keep winning all these straw polls?"

    Asked if part of his appeal to the Tea Party is that he is an African-American carrying a conservative message, Cain said no.

    "They really wouldn't care if I was green, red, blue or yellow - seriously," he said. "That's not the reason why. There is no remorse about - 'OK, we voted for President Obama, we're trying to send a message that the conservatives are not racist.' No. I don't believe that's it at all."

    Read more here.

     

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    bathroom design

    Your bathroom can be a sanctuary after a long day at work, and it should feel like a space that both reflects your aesthetic tastes and makes you happy. If you're content with the current overall design of your bathroom, but feel it needs that little something extra to mix it up, try updating the fixtures. It's all in the details and a few updates can change the whole vibe of your bathroom.

    First figure out what design theme you want to continue with. And if you have a plain white bathroom, you're in luck, because a blank slate allows you to create whatever design theme you want from scratch. The modern styles is for you if you like sleek, futuristic fixtures . If eclectic unique pieces catch your eye, go contemporary.

    modern bathroom


    Whatever your style, good lighting is essential. You can swap out your old florescent light fixtures for recessed lighting, or just change the lights above the vanity mirror or medicine cabinet. If you're a renter and can't make drastic renovations, use candles as a nice accent to add lighting and a personal touch to your bathroom.


    candles


    Shower curtains are a major focal point in bathrooms that don't have glass shower doors. Shower curtains can be super fun. Check out retailers like Bed Bath & Beyond to find a cool pattern and heck, pick up a new shower head while you're shopping.
    shower curtain

    Last but not least, don't forget about the sink area. If you want to go total overhaul, swap out your faucets and towel racks for a complete new set up. Pay attention to the smaller fixtures as well, like your toothbrush holder, soap dispenser and any another other fixture around your sink. Each item will help create a more nuanced look and personal feel to your beautiful new bathroom.

    bathroom fixtures

     

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    From IndieGoGo:

    'The Street' is an award winning novel by Ann Petry and the first book by an African American woman to sell over 1 million copies. The novel is required reading for high school and college students across the country.


    'The Street' is an important part of American literature and a story that highlights the American experience through the narrative of a committed, loving, aspiring mother and the residents of Harlem during WWII.

    We have made the commitment to produce a feature film based on the novel and we cannot continue all of the progress that we have made on the project up to this point without continued support. We have set a goal to raise $3,500 to cover pre-production expenses. These funds are essential in making sure that we are able to begin the process of securing the best talent, locations and crew available in order to ensure that the film is successful.

    Read more here.



     

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  • 06/09/11--08:36: Black Like Us: In Pictures


  • Mamie Till Mobley, the mother of young Emmett Till, used a photograph of his bloated and mutilated body to show the world just how brutal American racism could be.
    Major companies used wide-eyed, big-lipped, shucking and bucking caricatures of African Americans to sell everything from sugar and soap to household appliances and comic books.

    Malcolm X used the emerging medium of television and talk shows to make his case for black self-empowerment. And the country fell in love with Diahann Carroll in 'Julia,' one of network TVs first nationally syndicated shows built around a contemporary black character.

    Throughout much of the black experience in America visual images have been used to build us up and tear us down. They've been used to market products and promote propaganda, as well as push the cause of Civil Rights.

    It is in that space where the still burgeoning Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 1960s emerged alongside the growth of television and the popular pictorial magazines of the day. And where Americans were at once seeing black bodies beaten in the streets of Birmingham and black ball players darting across the color line to major league baseball fields - all from their living rooms.

    "Images were used not only to change white people's attitudes about race and to get them to support the Civil Rights Movement, but to embolden the African American community that had long been represented in negative ways," said Maurice Berger, a Senior Research Scholar at the Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture at the University of Maryland Baltimore County.

    Berger is also the curator of "For All the World to See: Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights," an exhibit showcasing more than 230 objects and 50 clips from TV and Film from the late 1940s to the mid-1970s that looks at what organizers describe as "a little-understood aspect of American history and culture." The exhibit, sponsored by The National Museum of African American History, opens Friday, June 10 at The National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C.


    "One of the really significant aspects of this show, relative to so many other shows about the movement, is that up until now almost every single exhibition about visual culture and civil rights have been about how images documented the struggle, most often by white photographers that show the protests and the marches and the police brutality," said Berger, who noted that all of the above was just one aspect of how Americans understood the Civil Rights Movement. "I chose images that were the most dynamic in their ability to change prevailing ideas about race in the United States."

    The exhibit chronicles the diversity of images from the movement days and before, including black baby dolls, family snapshots and black pictorial magazines like 'Sepia,' 'Our World,' 'Say,' and the Johnson Publishing Company magazines such as 'Ebony,' 'Jet,' 'Tan' and 'Ebony Jr.' There are video clips from TV shows, films and documentaries.

    The exhibition takes its name from a quote given by Mamie Till Mobley after she was questioned about distributing the gruesome photograph of her 14-year-old son, Emmett (pictured below), who had been brutally murdered by white supremacist in Mississippi.

    "Let the world see what I've seen," she said at the time, hoping that if people could see what happened to her boy, perhaps they would be more likely to support the cause of racial justice and equality.

    Though she sent the photo to many outlets, both black and white, only black publications initially ran the photo: 'Jet' magazine and 'The Chicago Defender.' But from the publication of that photograph, a whole generation of activists was born and a truth was shone in a way it never had before.


    "For All The World To See" is the latest from The National Museum of African American History, which is set to open its own building in 2015 on five prime acres of land adjacent to the Washington Monument on the National Mall. It is the only national museum dedicated solely to black life, art, culture and history.

    Lonnie G. Bunch
    , the director of the museum, said that the installation "illuminates the Civil Rights Movement in ways that most people have not experienced or understood," and sets out to show what the visual interpretation of blacks in America was.

    "In some ways we have gone through a variety of filters. We've gone through the Civil Rights Movement through the eyes of its leader, of the people who participated and then through gender," Bunch said. "This allows us to look at all of those."

    The opening sequence of the exhibit is a clip from 'The Weapons of Gordon Parks,' a CBS documentary about the famed black photographer, where he describes his camera as his "weapon" of choice in combating racism and inequality in America.


    "The show isn't just about Dr. King and Malcolm X," said Berger, the curator and author of a book that shares the same name as the exhibition. "But also about folks who took cameras into their own hands and did for themselves what a century of mainstream society could not. They captured the beauty, the triumph, the normalcy and the ordinariness that the mainstream either vilified or ignored."

    Along with iconic images and portraiture, there are also photographs of lynching and artifacts from a time when blacks were ridiculed in commercial advertisement and childrens toys, postcards and pamphlets.

    "Though I'm a trained scholar, I'm [also] a black man who finally sees my ancestors in this," Bunch said of the work and mission of the museum to shed new light on history. "I finally see all of these people that should never have been forgotten. It makes it unbelievably personal."

     

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    On Tuesday, I had the privilege of speaking at the United Nations' Women Global Coalition on HIV/AIDS and I wanted to share this experience with you. I've included the video of my speech (at the bottom of this post) and am sharing my complete transcript below. Today, I ask that you take a pledge to fight AIDS. Join me and Keep a Child Alive by taking the pledge.
    The women of the world know what to do. And they do it. They would do more if they had equal rights and weren't discriminated against. That is what we need to fix more than anything in our world. With my organization, Keep a Child Alive, we put the trust directly in the people on the ground, who are extremely capable to run these programs but lack the funding, medicines and health care professionals.

    If we show to the next generation of men and women affected by the AIDS pandemic that we care by providing the necessary resources of universal treatment that doesn't end, doctors and nurses, food programs, micro-loan opportunities -- this will empower them to live their dreams. And stop the pandemic in its tracks.

    We believe that, with AIDS treatment, anything is possible. We watch people become reborn with treatment. And I've seen it myself! At our clinic in Uganda, ALIVE Medical Services, a father came in one day, his name is Bashir, unable to walk and on his deathbed. He had seven children at home. Within one month of ARV therapy and food parcels from our ALIVE clinic -- Bashir looked like a new man and over the past year, his health has restored to a level where he is actually a father again.

    With the help of a small loan from us, he opened a boda-boda spare parts shop not far from the main road to Jinja. With funds from the shop, he is now able to send all seven of his school-aged children to school. That is empowerment. He can care for his family and contribute to his community because he is healthy. Without effective treatment, his seven girl children would have lost their father and their outcome would have been painful at best.

    Read more at The Huffington Post.

     

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    From ESPN
    :

    Two members of the San Francisco 49ers' famed "Million Dollar Backfield" who died within months of each other this year will have their brains examined by researchers at Boston University who are studying head injuries in sports.

    Joe "the Jet" Perry died in April at the age of 84, and John Henry Johnson died last week at the age of 81. Their families have agreed to let the former players' brains be examined by the Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy, the San Francisco Chronicle reported.

    CSTE is a collaboration between Boston University Medical School and the Sports Legacy Institute to address what it calls the "concussion crisis" in sports.

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a disorder linked to repeated brain trauma. The brain of former Chicago Bears safety Dave Duerson, who committed suicide in February, also was examined by the researchers and it was determined he suffered from the disease.

    Read more here.

     

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    WASHINGTON -- Sweltering temperatures across half the country had people doing what they could to stay cool Thursday. While relief was in sight after one more day of misery in the Northeast, the South was forecast to stay hotter than usual at least through the end of the week.
    Some schools in the Northeast planned to close early for a second day Thursday so students would not have to suffer in buildings with no air conditioning. Others canceled classes altogether.

    "A lot of people were complaining," said Stephanie Poff, 12, a sixth-grader at an elementary school about 70 miles north of Philadelphia that sent students home early Wednesday. "It is hard to study when it's hot out because all you're thinking about is, `I wish I could be in air conditioning."

    In Tennessee, where temperatures in many cities have set records over the past few days, tens of thousands of music fans attending two different festivals were feeling the heat.

    "I wasn't prepared for this at all," said Alberta Kelly of New Brunswick, Canada, who got sunburned and had to go shopping for sunglasses when she arrived in Nashville for her first CMA Music Festival, a major country music event. People also began arriving Thursday at a farm 60 miles southeast of Nashville for the Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival, which runs through Sunday.

    "We have more free water than we've ever had and we've put up shade structures," said Rick Farman, one of the founders of Bonnaroo, which messaged attendees ahead of time about what to wear and drink and has set up air conditioned medical tents.

    The six-to-10-day outlook from the federal Climate Prediction Center calls for continued above-average readings centered on the mid-South, including Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama.

    In the Northeast, the scorching heat was forecast to subside by Friday as a cold front sweeps in with cooler, drier air. High temperatures across the region are expected to stay in the low 80s through the weekend.

    Read more at The Huffington Post.

     

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    From CNN:

    When Bishop Eddie Long stood before his congregation in Lithonia, Georgia, on Sunday to declare he would not be focused on the past and would look forward, his supporters said that was the right thing to do after he settled a civil suit alleging he coerced young, male followers into sex.

    Sorry Bishop, as a man of God who is the shepherd of an international ministry, you cannot be let off that easily.

    From the moment Long was accused eight months ago, he had the benefit of the doubt. He was innocent until proven guilty, and I wrote in a column that if he was innocent, he should defend his name and character with every fiber in his body.

    He said as much before his congregation.

    Yet now he settles a lawsuit, keeps the details private, refuses to speak publicly about the accusations and expects some form of forgiveness? It's just not that simple.

    I get the whole issue of settling a lawsuit to risk further damage and put the issue behind you. But when you are a pastor who has preached against gay marriage and homosexuality, who has openly talked about the covenant between a husband and wife, who has talked about the importance of men leading their families as strong men of faith, there is an expectation on you that is greater than the average man.

    Read more here.

     

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    Erykah Badu


    From Clutch Magazine: When Erykah Badu tweets, people sure do listen.

    Wednesday afternoon, the soultress caused a full on frenzy when she tweeted only two words: "Motown folded"

    Erykah Badu


    Within minutes of Erykah's tweet, hundreds of her followers hit their retweet button and #ripmotown tribute tweets began pouring out.

    Today, label heads sought to do some rumor control and ease the web panic that has spun out of control.

    Learn what sparked the confusion at Clutch Magazine

     

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    John Boyega, Attack The Block

    As the weekend draws nearer, sci-fi fans are salivating for the release of the new thriller, 'Super 8.' The movie, from writer/director JJ Abrams and producer Steven Spielberg, is about a group of kids in Littlefield, Ohio, who witness some out-of-this-world invasion while making homemade movies with an 8 mm camera. But rather than blow my little bit of movie money on the Spielberg/Abrams collaboration, I'm waiting for another film revolving around a similar premise, but with a cast of different looking characters.

    'Attack The Block' (directed by Joe Cornish) also features a crew of young folks who witness an alien invasion, but the movie is set nowhere near the Midwest, much less in the United States. 'Attack The Block' takes place in a London 'hood, and unlike the mostly white cast in 'Super 8,' the gang in 'Attack The Block' is led by the young black British actor, John Boyega (pictured above) and features other young Brits of color. When the film debuted at the SXSW Film Festival earlier this year, a 'Hollywood Reporter' article titled, 'Why 'Attack The Block' Needs SXSW,' said the chances of U.S. distribution hinged on its response at the Austin event.

    The movie won a SXSW Audience Award and Sony Screen Gems picked up U. S. distribution rights soon after. But while the film has already been released in the UK, it has yet to get a domestic release date. The wait has been frustrating to moviegoers like myself who don't necessarily enjoy sci-fi films but do enjoy stories with diverse casts.





    "'Super 8' uses a cheat," says Arturo Garcia, who is the Site Leader for Racialicious.com and also covers comic books and science fiction for the site. "It's the old 'Mad Men' technique, what's the one way to avoid a diverse cast? Set it before the civil rights era or don't address the civil rights era."

    Actually, 'Super 8' is set in 1979 in a fictional Ohio city, but Garcia's argument still sticks to a degree. He explained that the film implies that, "This Midwest town simply does not have a black population." On the other hand, 'Attack The Block,' goes deep into a South London ghetto, thus making it essential that the area's real life ethnic makeup be reflected in the cast.

    No matter the setting, author Troy Cle says diverse movie casts can still be achieved. Cle's teenage sci-fi series, 'Marvelous World', which is based on a young black protagonist named Louis Proof, has been dubbed 'The Black Harry Potter' by Trevor Baldwin, nephew of James Baldwin. "The 'Matrix III' was primarily made with black people," says Cle. "To me, that was groundbreaking."

    But movies like 'Matrix III' are rare. Outside of Will Smith who has produced and starred in several sci-fi films including, 'I Am Legend' and 'Independence Day,' black characters in sci-fi films are seen as often as a blue moon. As Garcia says, "It's been almost 50 years since we first saw 'Star Trek' with Uhura on the bridge and we're still having these conversations. Clearly there's work to be done."

    Considering I had no idea who Uhura was, Garcia is right, there is a lot of work to be done not only in diversifying sci-fi stories, but also the audience who consumes them. Science fiction has been one of those genres most black people I know don't touch, and those who do, champion their fandom to show their allegiance to some alternative black lifestyle. I never saw one episode of 'Homeboys In Outer Space' much less an episode of 'Star Trek: Deep Space Nine.' Frankly, I found it hard to relate to the idea of some alternative universe. My world had its own monsters, we called them criminals. From what I saw in films, aliens were always invading the White House or a white neighborhood. In my world, ain't no such thing as a Superman, word to Gil Scott-Heron.

    This is why I am anxiously waiting want to see 'Attack The Block.' It explores the one sci-fi fantasy I afforded for myself, which was, if aliens ever did invade my neighborhood, my friends and I, much like the film's young stars, wouldn't run from them. We would run to them, with weapons, and a mouth full of trash talk.

     

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    Gay black menFrom NewsOne:

    This week CNN premiered "The Sissy Boy Experiment," an Anderson Cooper 360° special three-part series. In the special report, Cooper examines the life of Kirk Murphy, a suicide victim tormented by childhood psychological and physical abuse. Murphy's parents, in hopes of discarding Kirk's feminine behavior, took the then 5-year old to a UCLA psychologist in hopes that he would someday live "a normal life." Murphy would later be subjected to unrelenting abuse from his father, and ultimately take his own life.


    As horrendous as Murphy's story is, the Black community, too, is no stranger to its own "Sissy Boy Experiment." African Americans have historically and statistically exhibited disproportionately negative attitudes toward homosexuality. We've all seen and heard it before. Young Black males are pressured to live a life void of any and all things effeminate. I can count the instances where I heard the "sissy" moniker spewed to debase young boys who weren't manly or tough enough. That rhetoric is more harmful than any physical abuse could ever do. Homosexuality has long been a taboo among Blacks, which continues to haunt the race today.

    Read more here.

     

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    From the Huffington Post:

    When budget cuts threatened the arts, science, math and technology programs at Melrose Elementary School, its students' parents decided to take action.

    But more than just fundraise, they decided to create a public service announcement to educate the public about the budgetary threats to public school funding. Meredith Gullion, who has a child at the Los Angeles, Calif. school, wrote and directed the visually stirring video, GOOD reports. She lets children do most of the talking, telling the viewer about not only budget cuts, but about their compromised futures. Read more here.

     

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    From the Atlanta Post:

    Moguldom Media Group, the leading digital media company that develops premium online publishing brands serving African American audiences, today announced that its MadameNoire.com property, the premier digital destination for savvy, upwardly mobile African American women, now outperforms every other brand in its category according to comScore results for May 2011.

    In addition to being the fastest-growing lifestyle brand for African American women, MadameNoire.com already serves more pages per visit than most women lifestyle brands, an indication of its highly engaged audience.

    MadameNoire.com's unique online content includes a balanced mix of news, lifestyle, entertainment, and business coverage from the perspective of African American women.

    MadameNoire.com has also launched a new online video program, "She's the Boss," co-produced with Moguldom Studios, which focuses on African American women entrepreneurs and business leaders. Clearly filling a need previously unmet by longer-running traditional competitors such as HelloBeautiful and Essence.com, MadameNoire has achieved tremendous growth. Still less than a year old, the site already reaches more than 1.1 million unique visitors and serves 10 million pageviews per month (Google Analytics).

    The most recent comScore results show performance that leaves every competitor far behind, including average household income between $75,000-$100,000 and over 910,000 unique visitors.


    Read more here.

     

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