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Black Entertainment, Money, Style and Beauty Blogs - Black Voices

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    ny jets wide reciever

    New York Jets
    wide receiver Braylon Edwards is easing the burden of 100 Cleveland, OH high school students and fulfilling his promise to pay for their way through college, a promise valued at $1 million.

    The Jets player made the promise in 2008, when he told the students he would pay for them to attend any college of their choice if they completed 15 hours of community service and maintained at least a 2.5 GPA while in school.

    The students fulfilled their end of the bargain, and Edwards is putting his money where is mouth is and sending each student to the college of his/her choice on his own dime, according to Aol Sporting News. Edwards tweeted over the weekend: "As the 2nd most hated man in Clev & a man of my word, today I will honor a promise made to 100 students in Cleveland years ago. The last of my Advance 100 students will graduate from my program and head off to college on scholarships that I will provide them with. Guys, enjoy and embrace your new beginnings and remember your promise to me, to reach back & help someone else along the way."

    Edwards was a first round draft pick for the Cleveland Browns in 2005, and was traded to the Jets in 2009.

     

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  • 06/06/11--09:02: Beautifying Your Home Office
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    home office

    Your home office, whether a desk in your living room or a separate space altogether, should provide some comfort and pizazz while also serving to help organize your work and personal documents.

    The first step is to organize, organize, organize. Your desk won't serve you well if you can't find anything without knocking down half of your papers. Purchase shelves or a good filing system from a retailer like the Container Store, Ikea, Staples, or stop by a local discount store. You can find file organizers at 99 cents stores that work as well as pricier versions at major retailers.
    container store
    Next, try personalizing your desk with favorite family photos. If you have a large desk, you can place them on top. But if you don't, they'll look just as lovely hanging on the wall above your desk. You can use uniform frames or mix it up with frames in varying heights and designs. Check out Marshalls or T.J. Max for affordable frames to highlight beloved memories with friends and family.
    picture frames

    Finally you can bring a little of the outdoors in. If you don't have severe allergies, try bringing a plant or flowers to your space. Don't want to swap out new flowers each week? Pick up silk flowers from a local craft store like Michael's. Your desk won't know the difference.

    sunflowers

     

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    Rule of thumb. If you're ever lucky enough to run into Patti LaBelle at the airport, make sure you give her enough space or be prepared to face her 'New Attitude.' The latter appears to have been the fate of a 23-year-old West Point cadet, who is reportedly now suing LaBelle following an alleged assault by her body guards in March.

    ABC News reports that Richard King was standing next to LaBelle's luggage in the passenger pickup area outside George HW Bush intercontinental airport in Houston when LaBelle ordered her bodyguards to confront him.


    "Apparently, defendant LaBelle believed King was standing too close to her luggage, even though he was oblivious to her presence and the danger he was in," the lawsuit states. "LaBelle lowered the window of her limousine and gave a command to her bodyguards. They sprang into action ... LaBelle is hot-tempered ... [and] was a full participant in the cruel attack on King. She ordered it, and never tried to stop it."

    The suit went on to say that the Grammy Award-winner watched the vicious assault take place from the comfort of her limo.

    King's lawyers released a surveillance video (see below) showing him being punched and thrown into a nearby pillar before fleeing the scene. King was reportedly sent by ambulance to a local hospital, where he was diagnosed with a concussion.

    "I remember waking up the next morning with staples in my head," he said. "I've never been in a fight in my life." According to a police report, King smelled of alcohol at the time of the incident. His lawyer confirmed that he had consumed a few cocktails on the flight to Houston but was not impaired.

    King is suing LaBelle, three of her entourage, a taxi dispatcher and the airport for unspecified actual and punitive damages. LaBelle's team was unavailable for comment.




     

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    black anchor woman

    39-year-old 'Access Hollywood' anchor Shaun Robinson looks as good as most starlets half her age. At this year's 2011 MTV Movie Awards Robinson looked amazing in her sequined gold and peach mini dress while bumping elbows with Nicki Minaj and teenie boppers like Selena Gomez.




    Closeup
    black female celebrity


    Side View
    Jeff Kravitz, FilmMagic

     

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    rihanna

    From The Huffington Post:

    Josephine Robinson, a former tax lawyer for Gucci, is suing the fashion house for $5 million in damages after supposedly being subjected to racist comments and complaining about the treatment, allegedly resulting in her firing last year, the New York Post reports.

    Robinson, who identifies as a "dark-skinned West Indian Latina," also claims that she was told to pilfer more money from pop Rihanna, who posed for the brand back in 2008, after her superiors found out that the pop star was from Barbados.

    The Post writes
    : Robinson says she was working on Rihanna's contract with the Italian fashion house in 2008 when she got the shocking directive from her boss, international tax counsel Stan Sherwood.

    "When Sherwood discovered that Rihanna was from a Caribbean island, he told Robinson to 'tax the hell out of her' and find a way to allow Gucci to withhold 30 percent of her fee," according to Robinson's suit.

    Read here for more details.

     

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    From Huffington Post:

    Despite the political power, governors aren't always the most well-paid government employees in their state.

    In fact, a recent report from the Congressional Research Service finds that 77,057 federal government employees nationwide make more than their respective state's governor.

    The report, requested by Republican Senator Tom Coburn of Oklahoma, reviews 2009 federal employee salaries across the country, and comes during the on-going debate over whether public sector pay rates are draining state budgets.

    An array of government positions offer higher pay rates than that of governor. Government medical officers, for instance, are the most likely to be paid more than their governor with 18,351 employees nationwide receiving higher pay, according to the report. Air traffic controllers are the second most likely with 5,170 earning more than their governors.

    Some chaplains, archaeologists and food service workers are also paid more than their state governor, the report said.

    Read more here.

     

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    From the New York Times
    :

    Dijon James, 17, and Jo Doodle, 17, showed up for their prom on Friday night looking as if they had just come from a skate park.

    Both teenagers, who attend high school in Harlem, wore dressed-down skateboarder chic, in skinny jeans and sneakers. They munched on food from McDonald's and leaned against the tall marble columns in front of the New York Public Library's main branch, at Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street in Manhattan.

    Just inside, in the majestic, marbled Astor Hall, library workers were preparing for the annual anti-prom, an alternative prom hosted by the library for teenagers who do not - perhaps because of sexual orientation, style of dress, social cliques or other reasons - fit into the conventional prom routine, with its expenses and conventions of tuxedos and corsages and limousines and catering halls, and golden boy-and-girl couples.

    "Some kids come because of their sexual orientation, or the way they dress," Mr. James said. "We're just coming to have a good time."

    Read more here.

     

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    From the Huffington Post
    :


    Kenneth Mathis is the kind of man who values stability.

    More than three decades ago, when he was 19, Mathis was hired by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, a government position that seemed to confer assurance of middle class comforts.

    As an African American, he figured a job with a government agency would be a way around "the good old boy networks" that seemed to preclude his employment at many private businesses. He reckoned that a government job would spare him from the volatility faced by private companies, meaning his paycheck would continue through good times and bad.

    Mathis later took a job that kept him at home in Houston, joining the city's Housing and Community Development Department, a position that he figured would last until retirement.

    But his vision of a steady career culminating in a farewell cake and a pension came to an abrupt end last August, when his boss summoned him into his office, closed the door and told him that his job was being eliminated.

    Within minutes, a pair of plain-clothes police led Mathis to another office, where he was forced to surrender his government identification card and city-issued-cell phone. He grabbed his bag and a picture of his wife before being escorted to the elevator door.

    Read more here.

     

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    From the Root:

    While Lady Gaga herself (real name: Stefani Joanne Germanotta) is the artist and creative mind behind Lady Gaga Inc., her lesser-known manager, Troy Carter, is leading the enterprise's digital strategy. He's using a unique strategy involving a broad range of online tools to "keep the Gaga machine in overdrive," the New York Times reports.


    The combination of Gaga's star power and his aggressive deal making have made her the first Twitter user to reach 10 million followers (more than Justin Bieber or President Obama), and her Facebook page has 36 million fans. She's even begun promotional deals with Google, Zynga and Gilt.

    "Troy and Gaga are doing things with communications and fan relationships that we haven't really seen before," Gary Briggs, a vice president at Google who worked with Lady Gaga's team on her recent TV commercial for Chrome, told the New York Times.

    Carter has worked with the star for more than four years, during which time the Internet has become increasingly important in music management. "There was a time when radio stations wouldn't play Gaga's music because it was considered dance," Carter said. "Outside of live performances, the Internet became our primary tool to help people discover her music."

    Read more here.

     

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    From the New York Times
    :


    At home here on Saturday afternoon, Paul Telegdy, who heads up reality programming for NBC, directed his Web browser to a real-time search engine of Twitter messages and checked in on 'The Voice,' the Tuesday night singing competition that is his network's strongest new entry in several years.


    There were dozens of Twitter messages each minute from viewers about 'The Voice.' "Hey, what's going on?" he wondered. Then he remembered: the E! channel, an NBC Universal sibling, was running a marathon of the season to date.

    "I was sort of overwhelmed by how much interactivity there was," Mr. Telegdy said the next day, again refreshing the search engine. ("You have to be careful you don't check every five seconds," he added.)

    Helped along by online chitchat, cable marathons and a cast of four celebrity coaches, "The Voice" is in the midst of a crescendo, as this Tuesday's show starts a climactic period of live broadcasts and live rejections of contestants. The show, which had its premiere at the end of April, is averaging about 12.9 million viewers, and, more important for NBC, about 7.35 million of them are between the ages of 18 to 49, making it the No. 1 new series of the television season with that group.

    Read more here.

     

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    From the Wall Street Journal
    :

    There are two ways to look at our big city public schools. The first way is to see them as institutions that give our children the tools they need to make their way in society. When the education is good, it is a great equalizer for those boys and girls without the advantages of wealth or social standing.

    The second way to look at our big city public schools is this: as a vast jobs program for teachers.


    Read more here.

     

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    From New America Media:

    Is retirement a boom or bust proposition for African American baby boomers?

    As the 78 million boomers-over 9 million of them black--continue to make a gradual, but highly visible exit from the workforce, data show that pre-retirement factors, such as income and planning, are key determinants of how well off they will remain financially in their later years.

    Boomer and retiree Gilda Austin of Las Vegas, Nev., launched her retirement savings plan the day she began her education career by taking advantage of the pension plan made available to her by the Clark County Unified School District.

    "As an educator, you don't make a lot of money, especially when you're starting out," said Austin, who retired from the school district as an administrator in 2008. She also returned to work, this time as a teacher, to earn more before retiring for good in 2010.

    "I was vested in the state, so my pension is nice," said Austin, who left work with about 80 percent of her pre-retirement income. And she expects her retirement income to surpass her former salary in a few years because Nevada laws guarantee cost of living raises.

    Read more here.

     

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    gabrielle union


    From E! Online:

    For anyone who thinks that Rihanna's "Man Down" music video is over-the-top and simply out to grab headlines, Gabrielle Union has a message for you: It's not. In fact, tragically, it's very true to life.


    After being asked by a fan about her response to the controversial clip, the actress opened up about her own abusive past, and revealed a heartbreaking parallel between the video's story and her own: namely, that she, too, once tried to shoot the man who raped her.

    In particular, hers.

    The topic came up last week, when Union was soliciting ideas from her followers on how to better combat violence against women and kids. When a fan asked her what she thought of the Rihanna video, the 38-year-old star responded with unexpected honesty and candor.

    "I haven't seen it yet," she tweeted. "I'll let everyone know my thoughts on it when I do."

    A few days later, she had.

    "Saw 'Man Down' by @rihanna. Every victim/survivor of rape is unique, including how they THINK they'd like justice 2 be handed out," she tweeted.

    "During my rape I tried 2 shoot my rapist, bt I missed. Over the yrs I realized tht killin my rapist would've added insult 2 injury. The DESIRE 2 kill someone whose abused/raped u is understandable, bt unless its self defense n the moment 2 save ur life, just ADDS 2 ur troubles #mandown."

    Read more here.

     

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    Naomie Harris From The Huffington Post:

    The name's Harris. Naomie Harris.

    With the next James Bond film, for now titled "Bond 23," getting its pre-production wheels in motion, word is breaking that Harris, the actress best known for her roles in the second two "Pirates of the Caribbean" films, is leading the field of hopefuls vying for the much coveted Bond Girl role.

    Entertainment Weekly late Monday confirmed an earlier report from the British tabloid News of the World that Harris is in contention for the part, receiving word from an Eon Productions spokesperson that she has met with producers about taking on the role.


    If Harris does nail down the part, she'll take over as the lady co-lead for reigning James Bond Daniel Craig, who was joined by Olga Kurylenko in 2008's "Quantum of Solace" and "Eva Green" in his first Bond film, 2006's hit "Casino Royale."

    Read More Here

     

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    From Kentucky.com
    :

    Whenever I can, I like to write about African-Americans with ties to Kentucky who have made a mark in American history.

    Had I been given pieces of that kind of information during my school years, I might have paid closer attention in history classes.

    Sharyn Mitchell told me not to feel too bad about that.

    Mitchell, president of the African American Genealogy Group of Kentucky, said most of the members of that group had little interest in history until they made it personal. "I have learned more history doing this than anywhere," she said of her explorations into her family history. "I know more about the 1800s than present-day stuff." Mitchell, who has been researching her genealogy for 20 years, said her work often leads to information that can't be found in history books. At one time, that history was discussed at family meals, with the children learning from the adults. Read more here.Mitchell, president of the African American Genealogy Group of Kentucky, said most of the members of that group had little interest in history until they made it personal.

    "I have learned more history doing this than anywhere," she said of her explorations into her family history. "I know more about the 1800s than present-day stuff."

    Mitchell, who has been researching her genealogy for 20 years, said her work often leads to information that can't be found in history books. At one time, that history was discussed at family meals, with the children learning from the adults.

    Read more here.

     

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    From the Atlantic
    :

    President Obama poll numbers are nearing the levels he enjoyed in 2008, with one glaring exception: young people. Especially young white people. His approval rating is at 56 percent approval rating among people ages 18 to 29. That's higher than the 51 percent national average, but that's a decline of 10 points compared to the 2008 exit polls, according to the National Journal's Ronald Brownstein report. And if you want a look into the reason for the slump in one of the demographic groups that most strongly embraced Obama in 2008, it may be this: Obama's simply not cool anymore.


    The New York Times' John Vinocur finds ample anecdotes to flesh out that theory at Oberlin College, a campus that prides itself for its brand of hipster left-wing activism. Among Vinocur's data points: Four undergrad editors at The Oberlin Review signed an essay lamenting that most students had opted out of agitating, unlike alums who protested slavery and the Vietnam war.

    A symposium last month called "Oberlin-based Perspectives on the Obama Presidency" noted that students don't think Obama's cool anymore--all his cute little quirks have become grating, a polisci professor explained, and the real Obama can't live up to their idea of him.

    Students aren't even impressed that Osama bin Laden was killed, protesting that the world's most wanted terrorist was unarmed when he was shot.

    Read more here.

     

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    From the Los Angeles Times:

    Lakers guard Kobe Bryant has formed the Kobe and Vanessa Bryant Family Foundation, a nonprofit that aims to reduce homelessness in Los Angeles.

    Bryant will hold a news conference Tuesday at My Friend's Place, a nonprofit resource center that offers free emergency services to about 1,600 homeless people a year, according to its website.

    Bryant will explain the initiatives he has planned to reduce homelessness, create permanent housing and provide educational and career resources, which will include raising funds, improving services and working in conjunction with My Friend's Place.

    Read more here.

     

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    Garcelle Beauvais

    Garcelle Beauvais arrived in a purple jersey dress to the Surreal4Real Charity Event Benefiting The Little Princess. The actress was a stunner from the front, but it was the back of the dress that really made a statement. The fairly conservative front is contrasted by a plunging back. Beauvais completed her look with side swept hair and banging pair of pink studded pumps.





    Back View

    garcelle beauvais


    Closeup
    pink shoes

     

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    Bob MarleyFrom The Grio: Perhaps there has been no greater cultural export from African-American culture than its music. If, as Chuck D once announced, rap is black America's CNN, then music overall has served as a rallying cry against injustice and fueled black America's soundtrack for change. In honor of Black Music History Month, here are 25 songs that speak to music's ability to evoke thought, dialogue and action:

    "Get Up, Stand Up" - Bob Marley & The Wailers

    Written by Bob Marley and Peter Tosh, "Get Up, Stand Up," released in 1973, was among The Wailers' first international hits. A song of political importance encouraging ordinary citizens to "get up, stand up, stand up for your rights," Marley frequently ended his concerts with this song, which is reportedly the last song he performed live on stage before his death in 1981.


    "Happy Birthday" - Stevie Wonder

    Sometimes simplicity can compel a cause and this 1981 Stevie Wonder hit, advocating for a national holiday commemorating Dr. King's Birthday, is a testament to that. In addition to rallying African-Americans around a King Holiday, this version of "Happy Birthday" has supplanted all others for most African-Americans.

    "Man in the Mirror" - Michael Jackson

    One of Michael Jackson's most introspective songs, this 1988 classic, co-written by Siedah Garrett, didn't just speak of social ills but challenged the singer and those listening to "take a look in the mirror and then make a change."

    See the full list here.

     

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    From The Los Angeles Times


    As recently as last month, 'Training Day' director Antoine Fuqua was slated to direct a biopic about the life of Tupac Shakur. Now 24 Frames has learned that the director has stepped away from that film and is instead poised to join a movie that revolves around a different hip-hop artist: Eminem.

    Fuqua is set to come aboard 'Southpaw,' a fictional boxing drama written and conceived by 'Sons of Anarchy' creator Kurt Sutter and starring the Detroit rapper, said a source briefed on the film who requested anonymity because he wasn't authorized to speak about it publicly. The DreamWorks film aims to shoot later this year. Fuqua has no formal deal in place as yet. [Update, 6:52 p.m.: A person close to Fuqua said the two still must work out a number of deal points.]

    A studio spokeswoman declined comment.

    The project's progress is good news for fans of Eminem, who received acclaim for his turn as a talented rapper in 2002's "8 Mile" but has not taken a lead movie part since. The man born Marshall Mathers does have a propensity for working with top-tier filmmakers: "8 Mile" was directed by Curtis Hanson, and Eminem also appeared in this year's well-regarded Chrysler Super Bowl spot, which was helmed by decorated music-video director Samuel Bayer.

    Read more here.

     

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