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Black Entertainment, Money, Style and Beauty Blogs - Black Voices

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  • 05/31/11--06:20: Dressing Up The Backyard
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    patio furniture

    With summer finally here, spend your quality time out in the sun as opposed to cramped up indoors. Our sister site DIY Life embraces the trend of creating an outdoor living space that rivals any old family room.

    Tables, chairs and even a couch make any backyard seem homey. Throw in the same colorful pillows and accessories that would compliment your living room furniture.

    By locating your outside living area close to your back door, you can bring guests food and drinks from the kitchen with ease.

    backyard

    An outdoor fireplace or fire pit is not only relaxing, but is also an effective way to keep the bugs away. You can even compliment backyard furniture with an eye-catching rug made out of outdoor-friendly fabrics.

    patterns


    Looking for something slightly more extreme? You can always emulate lessons learned on HGTV's new show called 'My Backyard Goes Disney,' premiering Monday, June 6 at 8PM ET/PT. Tea pot playhouses, handpowered trains, Mickey shaped pools... the possibilities are endless.

    backyard playground

    The most replicable feature of the Disney makeover would be the garden feature. Plant color blocks bold flowers - DIY Life suggests petunias and mums - to create a surprising design on bare patches of grass.

    flowers


    Jodi Helmer chronicles how she turned her concrete jungle of a patio into a makeshift wildlife preserve on our sister site ShelterPop. She had already decorated her yard with potted plants and container gardens, but Helmer still thought that something was missing - animals.

    The National Wildlife Federation (NWF) has an online program that teaches how to turn outdoor spaces into certified wildlife habitats. Provide food, water, cover and a place for animals to raise babies -- while using green gardening practices, of course -- and you're good to go.

    Two birdhouses with feeders, a hummingbird feeder and a birdbath made from a teacup and saucer literally brought Helmer's yard to life - welcoming families of bluejays and butterflies to a once forlorn patio.

    Watch this DIY Life video on how to make your own birdhouse.

     

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    In the two-plus weeks since Don Lemon announced he is gay in tandem with the release of his new memoir, 'Transparent,' the CNN anchor has received both kudos and criticism.
    The praise is geared toward the courage it took to openly embrace his homosexuality as a public figure. The criticism lies mainly with the language Lemon used in his announcement. Lemon told the 'New York Times', where the news of his announcement first broke: "It's quite different for an African-American male...It's about the worst thing you can be in black culture. You're taught you have to be a man; you have to be masculine. In the black community they think you can pray the gay away." Lemon also mentioned black women specifically, expressing his concern "that black women will say the same things [about me being gay] as they do about how black men should be dating black women."

    We spoke to Lemon recently about those comments and his perspective on homosexuality in the black community, how life has changed since becoming an openly gay public figure and the women who still have a crush on him.

    Jozen Cummings: How long did you know you were gay before you came out so publicly?
    DL: I say in the book, I've always known I was gay. I think the exact quote in the book is, "Since I was knee high to a duck I've always known I was gay." I had crushes on boys - it wasn't in a sexual way, because kids aren't that way, they don't really know, they just know they have a crush on someone. I don't remember the first person I came out to, but I didn't come out to my mom until I was 30 years old.

    JC: Did you ever get a sense others knew before you said anything?
    DL: I didn't assume people knew or didn't know, but it's not something I ran around talking about. My colleagues at work who were closest to me or who I happened to have some sort of personal relationship with outside of work - they knew and we discussed it.

    JC: How has life changed for you since you came out?
    DL: Well, personally, it's been overwhelming. For a second there, it was like, 'Whoa, what's going on with my life?' Professionally, I'm not quite sure because it's only been a week and two days. You'll have to ask me in a year or three years or five years or 10 years, what actually happens. In some odd way [it has] turned out the exact opposite of what I thought. I thought I was doing something people ultimately would think I shouldn't be doing.

    JC: In what ways did you think this was going to be a detriment?
    DL: Anyone who has been in my position and who's gay and who's thought of coming out and either done it or not done it, has actually thought it was going to be detrimental to their career. That's why they haven't done it. Think about how many people you have out in broadcasting, in professional sports, in acting - people are worried about it. It's how our culture has been sort of groomed. And I have to say this, because I'm talking to you, aren't you a black journalist?

    JC: Yes.
    DL: So quite honestly, Jozen, there are people who are mad at me and say, "Oh you're throwing black people under the bus." No I'm not, I'm black, I live in the world as a black man, and I know how our culture thinks about homosexuality. You think about those things too as a black man, like, what are black people going to say about me, am I going to have the support from my base, which is black people, and if they turn their backs on me or they get upset with me, then what the heck am I going to do?

    JC: Isn't it fair to say it's not just black people who have issues with homosexuality? When you came out, a lot of people read your remarks about the negative reactions anticipated from black women as somewhat of an attack.

    DL:
    Black women are saying the same thing about me as they are saying about black men dating white women, I stand by that. All you have to do is read the blogs or go listen to the radio shows I've been on. When I've been on black radio shows [the subject of black women] inevitably comes up every single time. When I sit on white radio shows or have been interviewed by journalists who are not of color, it never comes up. So I know it's something that we need to talk about. I am a black person! Let's not forget that, and I know what it's like to be a black person, I know what our issues are. I'm not throwing anyone under the bus. I know white people have issues with homosexuality as well, but when you're looking at people who are out in the community and making a difference when it comes to gay issues, it's usually white people and white men - wealthy white men - who are on the forefront of that.

    JC: But others have been supportive, have they not?
    DL: I've been overwhelmingly surprised by the positive support in the African American community. People have come through and been amazing. I am grateful for that.

    JC: Black women?
    DL: You know what's funny? Women are like, "I don't care if you're gay, I still want to marry you. I can still fantasize, because I wasn't in a relationship with you before, so I'm going to keep my fantasy going." You should read my feed on Twitter or Facebook. I think women get it. People appreciate honesty and that's what I'm walking in.

     

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    tyra banks in head scarf

    Liberate your head scarf from night duty! Instead of just sleeping in your scarf, try to play around with different ways to turn it into a cool hair accessory suitable for both day and night.





    Headband

    One easy way to start out is by using a long, narrow scarf as a headband. Just tie it directly across the front of your hair. You can even use a regular elasticized headband as a placeholder to help you get your scarf where you want it. Tie the scarf together at the base of your neck and you're done.


    beyonce

    Hair Bow

    Another idea is to create two bunny ears or a cute bow on the side of your head, as seen in this photo of Beyonce from her video for "Why Don't You Love Me."


    head turban

    Turban

    One of the hippest ways to show off your fashion savvy is to wear your scarf as a turban. Bring your scarf to the front of your head and create a bunched knot like this one from June Ambrose's sold out collection.


    scarf braid

    Scarf Braid
    A new way to wear a scarf is to work it into a french braid. Use the scarf as you would a strand of hair and braid down weaving the scarf with your own hair.

     

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    From PAPERMAG.com:

    Actress Manie Malone is experiencing quite a few firsts right now.
    Born in Africa and raised in France, she studied Spanish at the Sorbonne, and only dabbled in modeling and acting before starring in her first big feature, 'Viva Riva!' (incidentally, the first film made in the Democratic Republic of Congo in over two decades). And when the 28-year-old answers the phone with great élan -- "Allo!" -- it's for her, you guessed it, first interview ever.

    Written and directed by Djo Tunda Wa Munga, 'Viva Riva!' is a noirish crime thriller, set against a fuel crisis and ensuing gang war in the Congo. The movie, which recently won Best Picture at the 2011 Africa Movie Academy Awards, is the story of Riva, a foolhardy small-time gangster on the lam after having stolen a truckload of gas from his merciless Angolan boss. Riva meets and falls in love with Nora (Malone), a woman who, despite her own troubles, has incredible resolve.

    Read more here.

     

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    From NJ.Com/The Star-Ledger:

    JERSEY CITY - Muscular brushstrokes bring to life the painting of a young black man who is set against a textured white background. Shades of red, yellow, orange outline angular features on his bowed head. His closed eyes suggest deep thought.

    This 24-by-36 inch painting, "Dans L'air," loosely meaning in French "There is a sad or happy air," is a self-portrait of Leonardo Laurenceau - one of the most talented young artists in the country.

    The 17-year-old from Jersey City will confess the portrait is part of a story about a boy on the verge of becoming a man.

    Laurenceau won this year's Art Portfolio Gold Award from the Scholastic Inc. Art & Writing Awards, joining several world-renowned alumni including Richard Avedon, Philip Pearlstein, Andy Warhol and Zac Posen, among other artists who've garnered the distinction over the past 87 years since its inception.

    "Leonardo's work was so surprising and fresh," said Gary Schneider, the director of education at the Montclair Art Museum, where "Dans L'air" and the rest of his eight-piece portfolio was exhibited earlier this year. "He has a 'painterly' style. He uses paint in a way that you see the brush strokes. It's also very well composed and it has boldness that's almost more like graphic design; yet the background is so expressive."

    He is one of 16 young artists in the country to receive the portfolio gold honor - a contest that started with 186,000 submissions. Laurenceau, who studied art at Jersey City Arts High School, takes home a $10,000 scholarship with the honor.

    Read more here.

     

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    Baseball great Hank Aaron was awarded an honorary degree from Princeton University on Tuesday. The university applauded the former home run king for confronting racism during his career with "quiet dignity."
    Henry "Hank" Aaron joined major league baseball in 1954, less than 10 years after Jackie Robinson broke the league's color barrier. While America still grappled with Jim Crow segregation in many parts of the country, Aaron negotiated the realities of being black in big time baseball. There were the cheap shots by opposing players, the shouts and slurs of less-tolerant baseball fans. But Aaron, as history and baseball buffs recall, remained the consummate class act.

    When he retired from baseball in 1976, after 23 years in the game, he left behind a long list of records, including: total home runs, games played, at bats, total bases, extra-base hits and runs batted in. He was also the first player in the illustrious 500 home run and 3,000 hit club.

    But it was Aaron's 755 home runs - breaking Babe Ruth's record of 714 - that really stoked America's pride as well as its prejudice. As he approached the new record, he received nearly 1 million letters mostly from mean-spirited fanatics.

    "Today America is a much better place with much more opportunity for all, in part because he gave all of us an imperishable example of grace under pressure," read the university's official citation to Aaron, who retired in 1976 and was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1982. He is currently the vice president of the Atlanta Braves.

    Aaron was one of six distinguished individuals awarded by Princeton University with honorary degrees during this year's commencement for their contributions to athletics, human rights, clinical research, education, the humanities, and the arts and law, according to the university.

    Among those honored with Aaron were Geoffrey Canada, president and CEO of Harlem's Children's Zone and Judith Jamison, former dancer, choreographer and artistic director of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater.

     

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  • 05/31/11--11:41: MC Lyte
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    mc-lyte

    There may have been other popular MCs to hold it down earlier for the ladies, but MC Lyte (born Lana Michelle Moorer) made an undeniably huge splash when she dropped her 1988 debut album, 'Lyte As A Rock.'
    But even before that album came out, the Brooklyn-bred Lyte was regarded as a deft lyricist with a husky, confident delivery. Her first song 'Cram To Understand U (Sam)' was a cautionary tale of a boyfriend addicted to crack cocaine. It caught the attention of label bigwigs at First Priority who eventually signed her.

    Lyte, who went on to release several other albums through the mid-1990s, proved that a female MC with the right balance of hardcore lyrics, street cred and sex appeal could appeal to fans of all genders. She found success precisely because she didn't compromise her image by dealing in sexually charged innuendo, wearing skimpy clothing or kowtowing to the demands of being a member of an all-male act. Lyte stood on her own with hits including "Cha, Cha, Cha,' "Cappucino,' "Ruffneck' and "Cold Rock a Party' with Missy Elliot.

    In recent years, she's appeared in several TV and movie roles, has been a judge on MTV reality show 'Celebrity Rap Superstar' and has done a fair amount of voiceover work for BET and other media companies. In 2006, she was celebrated by other female artists during VH1's annual Hip-Hop Honors show.

    Influence is felt by ... Remy Ma, Jean Grae, Lauryn Hill, Nicki Minaj

     

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  • 05/31/11--11:42: Run-DMC
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    run-dmc

    The Sugarhill Gang's "Rapper's Delight" was proof that hip-hop could churn out a commercially viable hit. However, not until Run-DMC emerged in the mid-1980s, did hip-hop fulfill its potential of being considered legitimate mainstream music.
    From the way they dressed (black leather jackets, Adidas, Lee jeans) to their skeletal, rock-infused beats (listen to "King of Rock' and "Rock Box'), the Queens-based trio (Joseph 'Run' Simmons, Darryl 'DMC' McDaniels, and the late Jason 'Jam Master Jay' Mizell) became the prototype for hip-hop's enduring street aesthetic and in-your-face sonic approach. Before them, rap groups took their cues from disco grooves and flamboyantly costumed R&B and New Wave performers.

    But Run-DMC's brash sound and hood-next-door charm marked a sea change in hip-hop. When they teamed with Aerosmith for a remake of the rockers' song "Walk This Way," the partnership represented not only a unique rap-rock hybrid but it signaled hip-hop's potential to reach across cultural and racial divides. Their laundry list of musical firsts is unrivaled in rap. They were the first rappers to have gold, platinum and multiplatinum selling rap albums. Plus, they're the first rap group to win a Grammy, appear on the cover of 'Rolling Stone,' perform on 'Saturday Night Live,' have a video added to MTV and sign an athletic product endorsement deal. And in 2009, they became the second hip-hop group to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

    These days, Run is known as ordained minister Rev. Run and has starred in the hugely popular reality show 'Run's House.' DMC has his hands in many projects from being recognized for his work with foster children and appearing in the feature documentary 'The People Speak,' to doing video game voiceover work and working on a new solo album. Jam Master Jay's 2002 murder case is still unsolved.

    Influence is felt by ... Public Enemy, The Roots, Nas, 50 Cent

     

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    grandmaster-flash-and-the-furious-five


    Just as influential as Herc and Bambaataa, the Barbadian-born Grandmaster Flash (Joseph Saddler) refined breakbeat deejaying by adding record scratching, cutting and mixing to his repertoire.
    As his DJ reputation grew, Flash also realized a shift was occurring in hip-hop where rappers were increasingly being regarded as the main attraction. To maximize his profile, he formed his own group, the Furious Five featuring MCs Melle Mel, Kid Creole, Cowboy, Rahiem and Scorpio.

    The crew went on to release "The Message" in 1982 and a 12" single of "White Lines (Don't Do It)" the following year, two songs which were game-changing breakthrough hits. Until that point, most rap songs tended to be more light-hearted, party songs. But the former song's sharp critique of the system and vivid depictions of urban life was a prime example of rap's power to address social conditions. The latter track had a similar effect, turning a tune about the perils and popularity of snorting cocaine into a potent anti-drug anthem.

    Through the 80s, the group endured a rocky period during which there were legal battles over royalties and struggles with drug addiction (Cowboy died in 1989). More recently, the crew has been first hip-hop act to be voted in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Flash's turntable is on display at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History in Washington, DC.

    Influence is felt by ... Public Enemy, Boogie Down Productions, Ice-T, Kool G Rap, Mobb Deep, Nas, Wu-Tang Clan and a whole generation of coke rappers from Raekwon to Pusha T.

     

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  • 05/31/11--11:44: Kool Herc & Afrika Bambaataa
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    You're obviously a pretty big deal if you're the guy largely credited for inventing a musical genre but have no records or music videos to show for it. But that's the irony of Kool Herc's place in hip-hop. The Jamaica-born DJ born Clive Campbell is the genre's elemental figure because he introduced his home country's tradition of "sound systems" (booming mobile DJ crews) and "toasting" (ad-libbing on the mike) to South Bronx youth in the 1970s. But more importantly, he pioneered a clever technique of playing records using two side-by-side turntables.

    At parties, Herc would take two copies of the same record and play the funkiest instrumental part (or, the breakbeat) of a song on one deck. Then on another turntable, he'd fade in the same break from the other copy. He'd repeat the technique over and over again, effectively extending the best part of the record. (Dancers in attendance came to be known as breakboys and breakgirls or 'b-boys' and 'b-girls.')

    One of Herc's biggest rivals was Afrika Bambaataa (Kevin Donovan), a former gang leader turned DJ and activist, who also played breakbeats during his sets. Bambaataa (whose name comes from a Zulu chief) transformed his Black Spades gang into a group focused on community organizing and cultural awareness which he later called the Universal Zulu Nation.

    But where Herc only had MCs who would hype the crowd on the mike at live club dates, Bambaataa took the concept a step further. Instead of just spinning other artists' records, he developed a group of rappers known as the SoulSonic Force who went on to record electro-boogie hits such as "Looking for the Perfect Beat" and "Planet Rock," a timeless slab of synth-funk and rap that used Kraftwerk's "Trans-Euro Express."

    These days, Herc has struggled with kidney disease and covering exorbitant hospital bills but remains respected for his immense contribution. Bambaataa, meanwhile, is also among rap's elder statesmen. He regularly spins at parties all over the world, is still considered an activist and has been nominated to be inducted to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

    Influence is felt by ... Every hip-hop DJ owes a debt of gratitude.

     

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  • 05/31/11--11:45: Old School Hip-Hop
  • Filed under:


    grandmaster-flash-and-the-furious-five


    As we celebrate Black Music Month this June, we figured the best way to honor hip-hop music is to recognize the pioneers who made it all possible. In this series, we're not only taking it back to the old school but we're also connecting the dots to today's artists who've been essential in continuing the tradition. If you didn't know, now you'll know.

     

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    Filed under:



    From the Huffington Post:

    This is not a movie review, a history lesson or a call to action. It is simply a statement of truth.

    I could go to painstaking lengths, detailing how deeply offensive and unfunny the repeated and gratuitous use of n**** in the movie The Hangover Part II was, but the damage in large part has already been done. This bell can't be un-rung.

    Nevertheless, this much must be said. The use of n**** is not funny, appreciated or acceptable in any context, by anyone who utters it.

    Hate crime legislation and the FCC are clear in regards to the word, the rest of us need to be clear too.

    I could create a historical time line ranging from Birth of a Nation in 1915 to The Hangover Part II in 2011 and illustrate how n***a is nothing more than the cinematic cousin of n***er and equally offensive when employed as a tool to generate laughs. But let's just keep this simple.


    Read more here.

     

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    From the New York Times:

    It might just be the most worrisome letter to the editor any news organization can receive.

    PBS fought on Monday and Tuesday to restore the Web sites for two news programs on public television, "Frontline" and "PBS NewsHour," which were crippled by hackers who said they were angered by coverage of WikiLeaks.

    The incidents were the latest examples of what security experts call "reputational attacks" on media companies that publish material that the hackers disagree with. Such companies are particularly vulnerable to such attacks because many of them depend on online advertising and subscription revenue from Web sites that can be upended by the clicks of a hacker's keyboard - and because unlike other targets, like government entities and defense contractors, they are less likely to have state-of-the-art security to thwart attacks.

    Read more here.

     

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    From the Washington Post:

    Dwyane Wade secured a rebound, dribbled around in a circle along the sideline, splitting between two Dallas Mavericks defenders. Once Jason Kidd closed in, he flipped a no-look pass to Chris Bosh that brought out what appeared to be the first snow flurries South Florida has seen in some time. Bosh elevated for a two-handed dunk, raised his left index finger toward the rafters, and as LeBron James and Wade jumped into each other, fans at American Airlines Arena tossed thousands of white handkerchiefs from the stands.

    The first celebration may have been 11 months premature, back when James, Wade and Bosh danced and preened over their uncommon free agent merger, but with the Miami Heat's 92-84 win in Game 1 of the NBA Finals on Tuesday night, the all-star trio took the first step in earnest toward ensuring that the scrutiny and strife of their first season together could be worthwhile.

    Five years after he tormented the Mavericks en route to leading the Heat to its first NBA championship, Wade again came through with a stellar fourth-quarter performance after struggling for much of the first half. He finished the game with 22 points, including a three-pointer that gave the Heat an insurmountable nine-point lead with just more than three minutes remaining. But he was excited that he didn't need another 40-point explosion to do in the Mavericks.

    Read more here.

     

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    Filed under:


    The Rev. Bernice King
    , daughter of the late Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., has made her first public comments since announcing her departure from Bishop Eddie Long's New Birth Missionary Baptist Church on Tuesday, just days after Long reached a settlement with four men who accused him of sexual misconduct.
    "I know there's been a lot of speculation and many comments about my departure from New Birth," King said during an interview on Atlanta's Praise 102.5.

    But it wasn't legal drama or sexual misdeeds that drew her away from the church as an elder, she said. After eight years and eight months, her season there had simply come to an end. King said that she was leaving New Birth to pursue "God's calling," not because of the lingering scandal.

    The timing of King's departure has drummed up speculation, though. Last week, word of a settlement came down from lawyers for both Long and the men who claimed that he sexually abused them when they were underage members of New Birth. What has yet to be seen is how the settlement will play out for Long or his wealthy church. While King said it was divinity that pulled her from the church's pulpit, it could be the beginning of an exodus from the church's leadership ranks. Long had told his congregants that he would fight the accusations, but instead, he has paid them off to avoid further legal wrangling. Details of the settlement have not been disclosed.

    King said her decision would have gone this way irrespective of Long and his very public legal issues.

    Since about 2005, King said that she had been wrestling with her calling as a minister and dealing with a number of issues, including the death of her mother, then her sister, a legal fight with her brother and a proposition to head the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, where her father once presided.

    "When I came to New Birth, I came for a season and I expected that season not to be quite as long as it was," she said. By January, she explained, she was no longer considering the SCLC position and could no longer mute the voice, God's voice, in her head. A few months later in April, she went to Long and told him that she planned on leaving the church to pursue her own ministry.

    "I have to leave to follow the assignment that God has on my life," she recalled telling Long. "He gave me his blessing and supported me in that."

    King said the rumors of her "resigning" amid the whirlwind of drama and innuendo surrounding Long's legal troubles were befuddling.

    "I heard I resigned," said King. "I was a little confused by that. I've never been on staff. I've never been employed by New Birth... I occasionally worked in the pulpit and preached at New Birth, but that was the extent of my function at the church."

    As for those still speculating as to her true motivation to leave the church, in Lithonia, Georgia, a suburb of Atlanta, she said, "I can't clear up the mind of God. I have always followed what I believe to be the voice of God in my life."

    So, what's next for King?

    Over the next several months she said she will be building the foundation for what she called a ministry, not a church.

    "What God is showing me doesn't look like what people are accustomed to," she said. "One thing that he told me was that I was to raise up kings for the Kingdom."

    As for any hard feelings for Bishop Long or the church, King didn't give the slightest hint of any.

    "Let me just say this," she said, "during my eight years at New Birth, eight years and eight months, I was tremendously blessed by the ministry of Bishop."

     

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    From Forbes:

    Twitter has long enjoyed a disproportionately strong following among African-Americans, and it's getting stronger still. A full 25 percent of black internet users are on the character-restricted social messaging service, and 11 percent say it's a part of their daily routine, according to the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project. That's up from 13 percent just six months earlier. And of that 25 percent, 11 percent say they use Twitter in a typical day.

    The numbers for white internet users aren't even close: 9 percent use Twitter sometimes, and 3 percent are on it in a typical day. Hispanics fall somewhere in between (19 percent and 5 percent), while Asian-Americans aren't included in the results for reasons Pew explains here.

    Why are black people so much more inclined to tweet? A couple of explanations have been put forth. One is a fairly straightforward network effect: The more of your friends that are already on Twitter, the more utility you'll find in joining. According to Slate's Farhad Manjoo, black Twitter users are more likely than whites to form into densely-interlinked clusters.

    Read more here.

     

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    From Clutch Magazine Online:

    Considered by many to be the godfather of hip-hop, Gil Scott-Heron was indeed a visionary. Since his passing last Friday in New York City, fans and fellow musicians from all genres have poured out their hearts to say thank you to the revolutionary who paved the way for many of today's biggest artists.
    Today, fellow Chicago native Lupe Fiasco posted a piece on his blog dedicated to Scott-Heron, whom the MC referred to as a "guiding light of a human being." The poem plays off Heron's infamous spoken-word piece "The Revolution Will Not Be Televised." Riffing of the 1970's classic Lupe pays homage to a great while reminding us of the present.

    The Television Will Not Be Revolutionized.

    Idiot boxes of the world unite! To fight off the effects of intelligence, replace smart quotes with fart jokes, substitute sense with scenes from "Martin," let the baby's bathe in that glow and learn all manner of things they don't really need to know!

    The Television Will Not Be Revolutionized!

    Channel the content of some rambling nonsense deep into the annals of yo' subconscious, deprogram and depress chasing some televised success, be them, that, they and those be everything but in control,

    The Television Will Not Be Revolutionized!

    Small claims Court drama, teenage baby mamas, Osama watching Osama, Celebrity Endorsed indoor saunas, the perfectly cooked piraña and other cannonfodder for you to ponder, all at the speed of imitations of life while the smoke of war gets inhaled thru the peace pipes, be still my beating heart and scare my brain from thinking thoughts as i sit intoxicated by the delights, sarcasm and 3 strikes thrown by my favorite pitcher in a sound surrounded, 3 dimensional, high death, full color mixture, wholly unsocializing and completely uncensored,

    The Television Will Not Be Revolutionized!

    By this one-eyed monster most of the world was raised, and by this hero most of the world was saved, and to this master most of the world is slaves, it factors your fears with actors and cheers from a live studio audience pushing you to engage in a heroic act of thoughtlessness for the grand prize of a little bread, fleeting fame in the circus and every thought in yo head,

    The Television Will Not Be Revolutionized!


    Read the rest of Lupe's tribute at Clutch Magazine Online.

     

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    From Our Voices with Black Enterprise:

    Never better, always clear - the indomitable Angela Davis.


     

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    From ESPN.com:

    After a mentally exhausting season in which he was unable to overcome the effects of a right Achilles injury as a member of the Boston Celtics, Shaquille O'Neal has decided to retire after 19 NBA seasons.
    In typical O'Neal fashion, he chose the unconventional approach of announcing his retirement via social media. He posted a short video on a new social media site called Tout in which he said:

    "We did it. Nineteen years baby," he said in the message. "I want to thank you very much, that's why I'm telling you first, I'm about to retire. Thank you, talk to you soon."

    O'Neal walks away with four championship rings, three Finals MVP trophies, one MVP award, and 15 All-Star appearances. O'Neal, a two-time NBA scoring champion, is fifth all-time on the NBA's list for career points (28,596) and 12th in total rebounds (13,099).

    Read more at ESPN.com

     

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    rings
    Next time you go shopping for accessories you may notice double rings are pretty much everywhere these days. The cool thing is that they come in a variety of styles to suit anyone's taste. Check out some of our favorites to get inspiration for your next purchase.

     

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